Archaeological dig in Anston Stones

Archaeologists from Durham University will be visiting Anston Stones again to perform a dig near Dead Man’s Cave on 3-15 of July this year and the team will be led by Professor Mark White.

The dig will concentrate on an area in a small gorge near the top path to Dead Man’s Cave and the team will be excavating small trenches near to the rock face. This is a follow up to the successful dig in 2015 and visitors will be able to speak to members of the archaeological team about their work.

Anston Gorge is designated a SSSI and with good cause. It is one of the finest examples of the gorges within the Creswell Limestone Heritage Area. The landscape is dominated by Magnesium Limestone cliffs and the general area supports distinctive types of rare plants and animals and ancient woodlands.The limestone was used in the rebuilding work at the Houses of Parliament after the fire in 1834. Dead Man’s cave was excavated in the 1960’s and archaeologists found flint stone tools used by hunters 12,000 years ago. Bones from Ice Age animals such reindeer and hyena were also found.

Dead Man’s Cave can be reached from the top path through the Stones, keep going until you see a field with what looks like a large bird box box in it, turn right into the woods for a few yards and the cave is in a little gorge when you reach the rock face.

Professor Mark White will give a presentation at Anston Parish Hall on Wednesday 13 July at 7pm. Everyone is welcome and visitors are recommended to view the display boards in the parish hall which give more information about Anston Stones from the Ice Age to the present day.

Anston Stones covers approximately 88 acres and  is a SSSI (pronounced “triple S-I”) site which is the designation for a Site of Special Scientific Interest and as such it is protected by law. Damaging any part of it can lead to a criminal prosecution.

Please be careful when you’re walking with young children and dogs  near Dead Man’s Cave as a wrong step could mean a nasty tumble and it’s a long drop.

(Don’t forget to clean up after  your dog)

After last year’s dig Professor White published a report:

Anston Archeological Dig Prelim Report 2015

This report, with photographs, explains in detail the findings of the dig in 2015.

 

Thanks to https://lovedinnington.wordpress.com/
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11 Responses to Archaeological dig in Anston Stones

  1. m ward says:

    Thanks for that information as I am very impressed with anston stones in all it’s areas of interest and education value As I have been walking over the years many times I have seen groups from different universities and interest groups looking at different things including the wild flower grass land wich is managed to a very good standard by a contract firm and anston parish council I find it refreshing to see all efforts been made to keep this sssi in good condition for future generations to enjoy as so many of use as had the pleasure to do

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  2. m ward says:

    Is it just test trenches and from what period are they interested in as the gorge was from the last ice age

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    • Watchman says:

      “one cave in the valley, Dead Man’s Cave, has already produced Late Upper Palaeolithic (ca. 14-12,000 years old) remains (Mellars 1969, White 1970)”
      From the published link.

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  3. christine sadler says:

    Anston Parish Council is in the process of putting information boards in the parish hall. There will be the report from Durham on 2015 dig, Creswell have offered to supply a time line and more information for display. During Durham’s stay in July this year the team will be giving a presentation in the parish hall and welcome everybody and anybody to this and to visit them at the dig sites. There is a lot of information and a warm welcome at Creswell with knowledgable and enthusiastic staff on hand. More information on dates of info board availability and Durham presentation coming soon. A visit to Creswell is a must if only to see the brown bear tooth, found in Anston Stones.

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  4. miss f sales says:

    I think the dig is a good thing but to advertise it to much may atract unwanted attention and spoil the objective last thing you won’t is a load of metal detecting but very interested in the outcome

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    • Mick Colman says:

      As far as I know there has been no metallic artefacts found in this location. Animal bones and flint tools. Metal detecting here would be a waste of time.

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  5. Veritas. says:

    Further to Mick Colman’s suggestion it might be an idea if RMBC bought the old library from APC and turned it into a historical knowledge and heritage centre. This would be a bonus for Anston IMV and it could also be used by local schools as another teaching aid and probably encourage more visitors to Anston and Anston Stones.

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  6. m ward says:

    Yes so I understand it will be very interesting to see the results and if possible to put eney finds on display for the public in anston to show people the importance of anston stones I no mortimer wheeler did a dig years ago not sure if the finds went to Cresswell or York but my feelings are they should have stayed here as part of our heritage

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    • Mick Colman says:

      I can confirm that at least some of the artefacts found in Dead Mans Cave are at Creswell Crags. It is difficult to know where they could be kept in Anston, on display, with the security that would be required. If anyone has any suggestions then I agree it would be a fantastic thing.

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    • eric says:

      Maybe Anston Parish Council could look after anything that is found as it seems to be a good place for old relics.

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    • Watchman says:

      You’re about as funny as a dose of ‘flu.
      No more comments which divert from the subject will be published.
      Eric, grow up or buzz off.

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